7.1 : National Legislation




7.1.5 Phase Out Schedule of Halocarbons in the U.S. (1)
Montreal Protocol U.S. Clean Air Act
Manufacturing Manufacturing Reduction Reduction
Gas Base Level (2) Freeze (3) % By % By
Chlorofluorocarbons 1986 1989 75% 1994 75% 1994
(CFCs) 100% 1996 (4) 100% 1996
Bromofluorocarbons 1986 1992 100% 1994 (4) 100% 1994
(Halons)
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 1989 HCFC consumption
+ 2.8 % of
1989 CFC
consumption
1996 35.0% 2004 35% 2003
(HCFCs) 75.0% 2010 75% 2010
90.0% 2015 90% 2015
99.5% 2020 99.5% 2020
100% 2030 (4) 100% 2030
Hydrofluorocarbons N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A.
(HFCs)
Note(s): 1) The phase out of halocarbons is consistent with Title VI of the Clean Air Act and is in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and Amendments. 2) The amount of gas produced and consumed in this year is established and defined as the base level. To meet basic domestic needs, levels of production are allowed to exceed the base level by up to 10%. 3) After this year, levels of production are no longer permitted to exceed the base year level. 4) With possible essential use exemptions.
Source(s): Federal Register, Vol. 72, No. 123, June 2007, p. 35230, http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/phaseout; United Nations Ozone Environmental Programme, Ozone Secretariat, 2005, http://www.unep.ch/ozone/index.shtml; and Title VI, The Clean Air Act of 1990, S.1630, 101st Congress., 2nd Session.









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Sources:

Federal Register, Vol. 72, No. 123, June 2007, p. 35230, http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/phaseout

United Nations Ozone Environmental Programme, Ozone Secretariat, 2005, http://www.unep.ch/ozone/index.shtml

Title VI, The Clean Air Act of 1990, S.1630, 101st Congress., 2nd Session